Conducting the Appraisal Interview

Appraisal Definition: An appraisal is the act of assessing an employee or a member of a team. These are normally taken place within an interview and are a terms of analysing the performance of that employee. From the analysis employees are normally given advice on how to improve, which they can use to make aims and objectives to build upon until the next appraisal interview occurs. Step 1: Prepare Preparing for the interview is very important, having a prepared interviewer will make the interviewee more confident that the review of their performance is being done properly and this in turn will make them more likely to listen to advice given. To prepare for an appraisal the interviewer needs to make sure there are no distractions, by removing the phone etc., make sure the room is set up so that the person being reviewed is comfortable, both mentally and physically. As well as this its important that the last appraisal done with this person is looked at, so that objectives which should have been achieved can be checked and its then possible to easily build upon what has already been covered over the years with this employee. It also means that the person being reviewed will be more confident that the reviewer is trying to do everything properly. Information should also be gathered from any of managers supervising this person. The most important aspect of being prepared is that both sides of the appraisal know what the point of the meeting is, what will be happening and why it will benefit them and the organisation. A good way to get to...

How to Approach an Appraisal

There are 6 main steps to approaching an appraisal situation, these are outlined below in bold, the extra text are some notes to help understand what to do and what not to do. Starting the Appraisal Good News First Vs. Bad News First Handling the Bad News – Criticising Make sure to note what they did well, adding confidence, but including the criticism Set objectives and ways the person can improve, so that they have something good to take from it Make the person think about themselves and work out the problem. If they understand what is wrong with themselves, they will be able to change it easier. Getting Information – Asking the Right Questions Don’t go back over points, as the employee will think the review is going in circles. Ask questions until the correct answer is given. Don’t use questions that lead to an answer Ask open questions Don’t show emotions Probe and check the employee to make sure the correct information is being given Listening to the Answer Summarising Let the employee do the summary, to make sure that they have taken in the review and they feel OK with what has been said. More on This Subject To delve in deeper to this topic we recommend the following articles from MyHRMBook.com; How to Conduct an Appraisal Interview How to Plan an Approach to an Appraisal Interview How to Set SMART Goals to Improve Performance Management We also suggest you read these articles from around the web; Six steps for performance appraisal success Performance Management Process Checklist Key Learning Points To keep it in you head whilst...

Appraisals and Performance Management

Appraisal Definition: An appraisal is the act of assessing an employee or a member of a team. These are normally taken place within an interview and are a terms of analysing the performance of that employee. From the analysis employees are normally given advice on how to improve, which they can use to make aims and objectives to build upon until the next appraisal interview occurs. Performance Management Definition: To keep an organisation working as effectively and as efficiently as possible, performance management is used. It is a process where expectation and objectives are set by both the employee and employer, and every certain amount of time, these are looked at and analysed to see where improvements could be made. The annual appraisal in an organisation is a very important time of the year, it allows employees to talk to their bosses, learning and developing their skills and also it allows the bosses to find out how objectives have faired and whether everyone has performed to a high enough standard. Not only does it help with performance, but it is a way to interact and make employees feel more motivated, as it gives them an opportunity to talk to people higher up than them. Its a way of sharing understanding and building upon experiences. Objectives of an Appraisal The following defines why the need of appraisals is there and why we use them so often in today’s organisations. To help see what individuals skills and potential is, allowing a company to build a database which they can look into and see people who are right for the job, quickly, helping efficiency....

Leadership Powers and Influences

Power Definition: The ability of a leader to influence its subordinates. Influence Definition: The effect of leaders actions on what the subordinates will do, how they act and behaviour. Both of these can help a leader lead his staff. Employees look up to leaders in a number of ways, seven of these are below: Position Power – The status of the person. Legitimate Power – Authority of position held. Reward Power – Power of rewards leaders can give subordinates. Coercive Power – Power to punish a subordinate. Personal Power – Characteristics or knowledge of the organisation. Expert Power – Power from knowledge and skills for the tasks. Referent Power – Leaders personal characteristics. To influence a leader must have interpersonal skills; Interpersonal Skills Interpersonal skills Definition: Behaviours thoughts and emotions that are directed towards effective interaction with other people. It is vital to effective leadership that you understand your own and others practice of leadership. Involving; Awareness of self Awareness of others Ability to work with emotions Tolerance of ambiguity Managing stress Orientation toward goal-achievement Persuasion Understanding and using power Working with teams Impression management Assertiveness Development and facilitation of...

Types of Leader

Leadership Definition: Leadership is the building of motivation through individuals in aid of reaching a certain set of objectives. A good leader is someone who can lead to good results, by using what he has in the best was possible. Charismatic and Visionary Leadership “A fire that ignites followers” These leaders tend to go beyond to do well for their organisation. They have an amazing ability to motivate and get the most out of staff which makes an organisation more efficient. As well as this they make a stand for the company, which followers will also do, showing their dedication. To help motivate staff Charismatic leaders tend to get the complete trust of their employees by showing respect and trust for them. This involves delegating important tasks which make the employees feel they are really needed. All of this makes an ideal culture, which many charismatic leaders aim for as they believe in looking towards the future, creating a vision of an organisation. However, as they have such a strong vision to make an organisation perfect, it can often lead to being too ‘perfect’ and doing the complete opposite, because instead of focusing on keeping the company afloat, they are concentrating on making their ideal world. A good example of a charismatic leader like this is Adolf Hitler, Martin Luther King Jr. and Osama bin Laden. (Not that I want to compare Luther King with the other too) Transformational Leaders These leaders are similar to the charismatic leaders, but on-top of that they are able to bring innovation to an organisation. This is done by looking employees concerns and needs,...

Path-Goal Theory

Leadership Definition: Leadership is the building of motivation through individuals in aid of reaching a certain set of objectives. A good leader is someone who can lead to good results, by using what he has in the best was possible. Path-Goal Theory Definition: This theory shows that a leader needs to increase employees motivation by making sure that they know there is a path to achieve what they want to achieve. This theory has two main points; the leaders’ behaviour and also the use of rewards to meet subordinates needs. This theory goes against Fiedler’s as the Path-goal theory suggests that leaders can change depending on situation. The four areas of the Path-Goal Theory are as follows; Supportive Leadership This involves showing the employees that you (the leader) cares. To do this a leader needs to be open and friendly with employees and know that motivation is a key tool in making an organisation work. Directive Leadership This is where planning and making goals is essential, it allows the employees to always know what they are meant to do and makes sure that they follow the rules and complete tasks in the appropriate manor. Participative Leadership This area means that the leader is willing to take employees ideas on board and listen to their opinions and suggestions. This helps with motivation as employees feel they are more part for what is going on within an organisation. Achievement-Oriented Leadership This is when the leader set objectives which allow the employees to know what they need to achieve. This also helps with high performance and quality as there is always something to aim...