Changing Culture over Time

Culture Definition: Cultures in organisation is defined by how the organisation is run, how the personalities within the organisation interact with each other and also how the structure of the company is set out. Most organisations tend to start off as a power culture, this is because it is set up by a person and he/she wants to run the company their own way, doing what they want to do and meeting their personal objectives, with the help of subordinates. This leads to organisation growth though, and this means that a power culture will no longer work. To continue growing specialist people will need to be brought it, and these types of employees want to feel welcome, want to feel part of the organisation. This leads to a task culture. On the other hand; it could be a line of work, like office work, where people just go to earn money. This leads to a role culture. After this point, most organisations will be in the role culture stage, however when things grow again companies will have to be able to change quicker and compete with other people; this will lead to needing greater flexibility. This takes us into a task culture. Key Learning Points How would you Define Culture? How would you Define a Power Culture? What are the Other Three Main Cultures? Image from Flickr...

Power Culture

Culture Definition: Cultures in organisation is defined by how the organisation is run, how the personalities within the organisation interact with each other and also how the structure of the company is set out. “A web without a spider has no strength” Power Culture Definition: Known as Zeus, as he was the all-powerful Greek god, this type of culture is based on a central power course, hence why it is normally found in Entrepreneurial companies, as in these type of organisation it tends to be the leader (the entrepreneur) who wants to lead the company and make it grow, as they company grows it is likely to change to another power, as one person cannot expand that much, but we will look into that later.   As with most of these small organisations, the middle of the culture is the most important place, with the decisions being made and the leadership being found. However, if the other parts of the web are good enough then these people will tend to get on with the work themselves and not need too much influence. To make this work at its best, the subordinates need to think on the same wavelengths as the leader. Decisions in this type of organisation often happen because of the outcome of influences, instead on well thought out logical steps, hence why it is so hard to have a start-up company staying afloat. This type of organisation revolves heavily around the leader, as stated above, and due to this the main threat for this business is its leader itself. The culture allows for quick change, mainly due to...

Leadership Powers and Influences

Power Definition: The ability of a leader to influence its subordinates. Influence Definition: The effect of leaders actions on what the subordinates will do, how they act and behaviour. Both of these can help a leader lead his staff. Employees look up to leaders in a number of ways, seven of these are below: Position Power – The status of the person. Legitimate Power – Authority of position held. Reward Power – Power of rewards leaders can give subordinates. Coercive Power – Power to punish a subordinate. Personal Power – Characteristics or knowledge of the organisation. Expert Power – Power from knowledge and skills for the tasks. Referent Power – Leaders personal characteristics. To influence a leader must have interpersonal skills; Interpersonal Skills Interpersonal skills Definition: Behaviours thoughts and emotions that are directed towards effective interaction with other people. It is vital to effective leadership that you understand your own and others practice of leadership. Involving; Awareness of self Awareness of others Ability to work with emotions Tolerance of ambiguity Managing stress Orientation toward goal-achievement Persuasion Understanding and using power Working with teams Impression management Assertiveness Development and facilitation of...

Types of Leader

Leadership Definition: Leadership is the building of motivation through individuals in aid of reaching a certain set of objectives. A good leader is someone who can lead to good results, by using what he has in the best was possible. Charismatic and Visionary Leadership “A fire that ignites followers” These leaders tend to go beyond to do well for their organisation. They have an amazing ability to motivate and get the most out of staff which makes an organisation more efficient. As well as this they make a stand for the company, which followers will also do, showing their dedication. To help motivate staff Charismatic leaders tend to get the complete trust of their employees by showing respect and trust for them. This involves delegating important tasks which make the employees feel they are really needed. All of this makes an ideal culture, which many charismatic leaders aim for as they believe in looking towards the future, creating a vision of an organisation. However, as they have such a strong vision to make an organisation perfect, it can often lead to being too ‘perfect’ and doing the complete opposite, because instead of focusing on keeping the company afloat, they are concentrating on making their ideal world. A good example of a charismatic leader like this is Adolf Hitler, Martin Luther King Jr. and Osama bin Laden. (Not that I want to compare Luther King with the other too) Transformational Leaders These leaders are similar to the charismatic leaders, but on-top of that they are able to bring innovation to an organisation. This is done by looking employees concerns and needs,...