Performance Management

Performance Management Definition: Helps to contribute to the effectiveness of the management of individuals and teams in an organisation, as to to help with the performance of the organisation. To achieve this it needs to be made that everyone shares the same understanding of objectives and targets. The ‘Big Idea’ (Purcell, 2003) From some research which was carried out at the University of Bath, Purcell et al found that organisations who shared a common goal, as in all of the individuals shared the same beliefs, then the company would do better. This was known as the ‘Big Idea’. This could be anything, from believing that customers were the most important aspect, to believing that quality was the key, for example Toyota set out with the intention of providing cars which were not only high quality, but were good value for money, and over the course of their life, they have generally kept to that ‘Big Idea’. This section of Performance Management can be linked quite nicely into Diversity, as that section of an organisation also looks into the affect people have on the effectiveness of a business. You can have a very diverse workforce, but this may mean that people do not think alike and therefore common goals, and the ‘Big Idea’ are not built upon. AMO (Purcell, 2007) AMO A – Ability M – Motivation O – Opportunity This theory described by Purcell shows us that people have the ability to learn and will want to work in organisation where their abilities are seen, built upon and used in a way which benefits both them and the organisation....

Performance Management Using Technology

Performance Management Definition: To keep an organisation working as effectively and as efficiently as possible, performance management is used. It is a process where expectation and objectives are set by both the employee and employer, and every certain amount of time, these are looked at and analysed to see where improvements could be made. Technology Definition: The application of scientific methods to make practical methods to do tasks. As with most things in modern times, technology is being more useful in the area of Performance Management as it allows people to complete online forms, questionnaires and such to allow managers to get a quick idea of how people are performing, whether targets are being met and where improvements can be made. Technology allows this to all be done much quicker, as employees can quickly go on organisations Intranet, fill in a form and then get on with their work. This is instead of having to fill in a pen and paper questionnaire/form which are often neglected and take more time. This means that performance management can be carried out more regularly, providing more information for managers. Images from Flickr...

How to Approach an Appraisal

There are 6 main steps to approaching an appraisal situation, these are outlined below in bold, the extra text are some notes to help understand what to do and what not to do. Starting the Appraisal Good News First Vs. Bad News First Handling the Bad News – Criticising Make sure to note what they did well, adding confidence, but including the criticism Set objectives and ways the person can improve, so that they have something good to take from it Make the person think about themselves and work out the problem. If they understand what is wrong with themselves, they will be able to change it easier. Getting Information – Asking the Right Questions Don’t go back over points, as the employee will think the review is going in circles. Ask questions until the correct answer is given. Don’t use questions that lead to an answer Ask open questions Don’t show emotions Probe and check the employee to make sure the correct information is being given Listening to the Answer Summarising Let the employee do the summary, to make sure that they have taken in the review and they feel OK with what has been said. More on This Subject To delve in deeper to this topic we recommend the following articles from MyHRMBook.com; How to Conduct an Appraisal Interview How to Plan an Approach to an Appraisal Interview How to Set SMART Goals to Improve Performance Management We also suggest you read these articles from around the web; Six steps for performance appraisal success Performance Management Process Checklist Key Learning Points To keep it in you head whilst...

Task Culture

Culture Definition: Cultures in organisation is defined by how the organisation is run, how the personalities within the organisation interact with each other and also how the structure of the company is set out. Task Culture Definition: This culture doesn’t follow the others, as instead of having a Greek symbol; it follows the picture of a net, with some being stronger than others, showing leaders and more influential people within the organisation. Another name this goes by is the matrix structure, which you may have seen in Business Studies. This culture is all about getting the right people together and then letting them get on with the task in hand. This type of culture is all about team work and because of this is lead by expert power, the people with more knowledge and experience will tend to be the people who lead this type of culture in an organisation and bring the teams together to work towards the common goal. However, due to the team aspect ranks and such are normally ignored in favour of reaching the common goal. As this type of culture is easy to change within, they tend to be able to be adaptable when it comes with keeping up with competitors and the market they are in. Decisions are made quickly because people are able to discuss the changes which are being thought about, in the teams they have and therefore ideas get put forward. This is why these types of organisations tend to be in competitive markets, such as the Internet market, where product life is relatively short and change is needed to keep...