3 Reasons Why Culture is So Important within Organisations

Culture comes up a lot in business and organisations, especially in the academic side around the subject. Despite this though, many people are ok with just accepting a business culture and going along with it, believing that once a culture has come into play, it can’t be changed. Culture is one of the main reasons that companies fail. Even with a great idea, a culture can cripple an organisation from the inside out. In today’s article, I would like to discuss the 5 reasons why culture is so important. Having the Right People It can take years to acquire a team of the right people. Yet that team could ultimately be the failure of the business, because it doesn’t fit together, the culture doesn’t work. Let’s use a football team as an example. Real Madrid and Barcelona of late are the perfect examples. Real Madrid have always been seen as having best players in the world, they spend millions and millions getting these players so that they can compete, but then Barcelona beat them, because they still have great players, but they have built a team… It is exactly the same in businesses around the world. The best companies don’t necessarily always have the best employees, but they have employees who fit with the rest of the group and work well together. Projecting a Brand Image People often don’t think of this, but a culture within an organisation can be a deciding factor of what kind of brand image is projected to people outside of the company. Take Google for example, a few years ago they were gaining a...

Performance Management

Performance Management Definition: Helps to contribute to the effectiveness of the management of individuals and teams in an organisation, as to to help with the performance of the organisation. To achieve this it needs to be made that everyone shares the same understanding of objectives and targets. The ‘Big Idea’ (Purcell, 2003) From some research which was carried out at the University of Bath, Purcell et al found that organisations who shared a common goal, as in all of the individuals shared the same beliefs, then the company would do better. This was known as the ‘Big Idea’. This could be anything, from believing that customers were the most important aspect, to believing that quality was the key, for example Toyota set out with the intention of providing cars which were not only high quality, but were good value for money, and over the course of their life, they have generally kept to that ‘Big Idea’. This section of Performance Management can be linked quite nicely into Diversity, as that section of an organisation also looks into the affect people have on the effectiveness of a business. You can have a very diverse workforce, but this may mean that people do not think alike and therefore common goals, and the ‘Big Idea’ are not built upon. AMO (Purcell, 2007) AMO A – Ability M – Motivation O – Opportunity This theory described by Purcell shows us that people have the ability to learn and will want to work in organisation where their abilities are seen, built upon and used in a way which benefits both them and the organisation....

Conducting the Appraisal Interview

Appraisal Definition: An appraisal is the act of assessing an employee or a member of a team. These are normally taken place within an interview and are a terms of analysing the performance of that employee. From the analysis employees are normally given advice on how to improve, which they can use to make aims and objectives to build upon until the next appraisal interview occurs. Step 1: Prepare Preparing for the interview is very important, having a prepared interviewer will make the interviewee more confident that the review of their performance is being done properly and this in turn will make them more likely to listen to advice given. To prepare for an appraisal the interviewer needs to make sure there are no distractions, by removing the phone etc., make sure the room is set up so that the person being reviewed is comfortable, both mentally and physically. As well as this its important that the last appraisal done with this person is looked at, so that objectives which should have been achieved can be checked and its then possible to easily build upon what has already been covered over the years with this employee. It also means that the person being reviewed will be more confident that the reviewer is trying to do everything properly. Information should also be gathered from any of managers supervising this person. The most important aspect of being prepared is that both sides of the appraisal know what the point of the meeting is, what will be happening and why it will benefit them and the organisation. A good way to get to...

How to Approach an Appraisal

There are 6 main steps to approaching an appraisal situation, these are outlined below in bold, the extra text are some notes to help understand what to do and what not to do. Starting the Appraisal Good News First Vs. Bad News First Handling the Bad News – Criticising Make sure to note what they did well, adding confidence, but including the criticism Set objectives and ways the person can improve, so that they have something good to take from it Make the person think about themselves and work out the problem. If they understand what is wrong with themselves, they will be able to change it easier. Getting Information – Asking the Right Questions Don’t go back over points, as the employee will think the review is going in circles. Ask questions until the correct answer is given. Don’t use questions that lead to an answer Ask open questions Don’t show emotions Probe and check the employee to make sure the correct information is being given Listening to the Answer Summarising Let the employee do the summary, to make sure that they have taken in the review and they feel OK with what has been said. More on This Subject To delve in deeper to this topic we recommend the following articles from MyHRMBook.com; How to Conduct an Appraisal Interview How to Plan an Approach to an Appraisal Interview How to Set SMART Goals to Improve Performance Management We also suggest you read these articles from around the web; Six steps for performance appraisal success Performance Management Process Checklist Key Learning Points To keep it in you head whilst...

Appraisals and Performance Management

Appraisal Definition: An appraisal is the act of assessing an employee or a member of a team. These are normally taken place within an interview and are a terms of analysing the performance of that employee. From the analysis employees are normally given advice on how to improve, which they can use to make aims and objectives to build upon until the next appraisal interview occurs. Performance Management Definition: To keep an organisation working as effectively and as efficiently as possible, performance management is used. It is a process where expectation and objectives are set by both the employee and employer, and every certain amount of time, these are looked at and analysed to see where improvements could be made. The annual appraisal in an organisation is a very important time of the year, it allows employees to talk to their bosses, learning and developing their skills and also it allows the bosses to find out how objectives have faired and whether everyone has performed to a high enough standard. Not only does it help with performance, but it is a way to interact and make employees feel more motivated, as it gives them an opportunity to talk to people higher up than them. Its a way of sharing understanding and building upon experiences. Objectives of an Appraisal The following defines why the need of appraisals is there and why we use them so often in today’s organisations. To help see what individuals skills and potential is, allowing a company to build a database which they can look into and see people who are right for the job, quickly, helping efficiency....