3 Reasons Why Culture is So Important within Organisations

Culture comes up a lot in business and organisations, especially in the academic side around the subject. Despite this though, many people are ok with just accepting a business culture and going along with it, believing that once a culture has come into play, it can’t be changed. Culture is one of the main reasons that companies fail. Even with a great idea, a culture can cripple an organisation from the inside out. In today’s article, I would like to discuss the 5 reasons why culture is so important. Having the Right People It can take years to acquire a team of the right people. Yet that team could ultimately be the failure of the business, because it doesn’t fit together, the culture doesn’t work. Let’s use a football team as an example. Real Madrid and Barcelona of late are the perfect examples. Real Madrid have always been seen as having best players in the world, they spend millions and millions getting these players so that they can compete, but then Barcelona beat them, because they still have great players, but they have built a team… It is exactly the same in businesses around the world. The best companies don’t necessarily always have the best employees, but they have employees who fit with the rest of the group and work well together. Projecting a Brand Image People often don’t think of this, but a culture within an organisation can be a deciding factor of what kind of brand image is projected to people outside of the company. Take Google for example, a few years ago they were gaining a...

Changing Culture over Time

Culture Definition: Cultures in organisation is defined by how the organisation is run, how the personalities within the organisation interact with each other and also how the structure of the company is set out. Most organisations tend to start off as a power culture, this is because it is set up by a person and he/she wants to run the company their own way, doing what they want to do and meeting their personal objectives, with the help of subordinates. This leads to organisation growth though, and this means that a power culture will no longer work. To continue growing specialist people will need to be brought it, and these types of employees want to feel welcome, want to feel part of the organisation. This leads to a task culture. On the other hand; it could be a line of work, like office work, where people just go to earn money. This leads to a role culture. After this point, most organisations will be in the role culture stage, however when things grow again companies will have to be able to change quicker and compete with other people; this will lead to needing greater flexibility. This takes us into a task culture. Key Learning Points How would you Define Culture? How would you Define a Power Culture? What are the Other Three Main Cultures? Image from Flickr...

What Influences the Business Culture?

Culture Definition: Cultures in organisation is defined by how the organisation is run, how the personalities within the organisation interact with each other and also how the structure of the company is set out. Many different factors influence what type of culture an organisation will be, some can be taken from the information found on the; Power Role Task And Person pages, but as well as that there are factors such as; The History The Technology The Size The Environment The Owners The Employees I will be going over a brief overview of the factors here, but as most are pretty obvious, I won’t go into too much detail. The History Age of company – Older companies will tend to be more power oriented, due to a stricter view on work back in the day, when newer companies tend to think about employees more. Technology Technology companies tend to be smaller and work in an innovation culture, meaning that they need to be more team orientated, showing a task culture. Size As stated in the power culture, when companies are small it is more under one person to control it. However, it can also mean that more people are involved, making it a person culture. Normally bigger companies are role or task. Environment This means the market they are in and the competition around them. If it is a quick changing market, then the organisation needs to keep up, so must have a culture which allows this. Owners The way the owners want to run the organisation is also a big point, if they want to have all the power...

Role Culture

Culture Definition: Cultures in organisation is defined by how the organisation is run, how the personalities within the organisation interact with each other and also how the structure of the company is set out. Role Culture Definition: This can be seen as a Greek Temple, there is the top, the leaders, but so that these people succeed they need the people below. The god represented for this culture is Apollo, the Greek god of reason. This is because this culture works by leaders and employees being logical and being rational. Each department in this type of culture can be seen as a pillar for the temple. The pillars need to be, and often are, strong. All of these sections in an organisation are controlled by having appropriate job descriptions, procedures for communication and rules to help arguments not get out of line. This culture is very much along the lines of making everyone work together so that together the strength will grow and so will the organisation. There is a main set of leaders in this type of culture, with them relying on the ‘pillars’ doing their jobs well and allowing the people at the top to concentrate on what they need to do. As this culture depends on a job being done to the standard of that job description, the actual person in the job doesn’t matter as much. As long as the job is being done to a good enough standard then the person doing it will be safe. As performances above what is needed tend not to be essential, then people may become unmotivated in this culture, as they...